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Worthington Soccer Coaching Tips

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50 Coaching drills

50 Coaching drills. Complete soccer coaching guide. 50 Soccer Drills, Exercises and Tips for Better Coaching

I feel these activities are suitable because they’ve been tried and tested by many soccer coaches and teams. You’ll notice that this is a collection of material gathered from my experience as a coach, my summer soccer camp experiences, talking with other coaches, and from coaches who subscribe to my

soccer newsletter available at finesoccer.com.

In addition to specific drills, there are many activities designed to be used as scrimmages at the end of practice. I highly recommend spending some time during or towards the end of your practice to play games that include the skills your players were working on. The kids will have more fun and you will be

surprised at how the carry over from practicing these skills in a small or adapted version of the game improves the players overall real soccer game performance. I hope you find these activities helpful, fun, and effective in achieving your desire to have the best team you can have. As you begin to try them, I would enjoy hearing your feedback regarding which ones you found most helpful as well as the ones the kids liked to do the most.

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Worthington soccer coaching tips

  • Nigel Worthington is former manager of the Nothern Ireland Men's national team. As a player, he was a left full back and occasional left midfielder, playing the majority of his club football for Sheffield Wednesday. As an international player, he is Northern Ireland's 9th most capped player with 66 appearances.

Nigel Worthington on The Coach Show

Worthington began his managerial career as player-manager of Blackpool in 1997 before he succeeded Hamilton as manager of Norwich City in 2000. He guided Norwich to the Premier League in the 2003–04 season but left just over two years afterwards, having failed to keep them in the top-flight in 2005. He was briefly caretaker manager of Leicester City in 2007 prior to starting his current role as manager of Northern Ireland.

As a tough-tackling no-nonsense defender, Worthington started his career with home town team, Ballymena United, where he was Northern Ireland Young Player of the Year in 1980, prior to his transfer to Notts County where he spent three years. Worthington is best remembered for his time at Sheffield Wednesday, where he spent ten years, and was a member of the Owls' side that won the League Cup as well as promotion to the top flight in 1990–91. Two years later, Worthington and his teammates were losing finalists in both the League Cup and FA Cup. After leaving Wednesday in the summer of 1994, Worthington spent two years at Leeds United and one season at Stoke City. He was then named player-manager at Blackpool in 1997.

Internationally, Worthington made his debut in a 1–1 draw away to Wales in May 1984. This was notable for being Northern Ireland's final game in the last ever British Home Championship, the point gained being enough for Northern Ireland to win (and keep in perpetuity) the famous old trophy. In Northern Ireland's subsequent successful Qualifying Campaign for the 1986 World Cup Finals in Mexico, Worthington was an important member of Billy Bingham's squad, starting two Qualifying matches and coming on as substitute in three more. In the Finals tournament itself, Worthington started two of Northern Ireland's three matches, against Algeria and Spain. Worthington's 66th and final cap was gained when he came on as a substitute in Northern Ireland's 3–0 victory in a home friendly against Belgium in February 1997.

of the 1997–98 season. He soon retired from playing to take on sole managerial duties, but

two and a half seasons in charge ended with his resignation following a dip in form that saw

the club lying in the thick of the Second Division relegation battle.

After acting as assistant to Howard Wilkinson with the England under-21 team, Worthington moved to Norwich City at the start of the 2000–01 season as assistant to Bryan Hamilton. He was appointed caretaker manager on 4 December 2000 after Hamilton resigned and the following month was appointed as permanent manager[1] and he later saved the club from relegation to the Second Division.[2] The 2001–02 season, Worthington's first full season, saw the club reach the play-off final but lost to Birmingham City on penalties.

In his third full season in charge, 2003–04, Worthington took Norwich to the Premier League after winning the First Division with a club record 94 points.[2] However, the club struggled in Premier League and found itself in a battle against relegation. Before the final game of the season the club was in pole position to survive but they were defeated 6–0 by Fulham and ended the season 19th in the table having conceded 77 goals — only five other teams have ever conceded more goals in a Premier League season.

Norwich were tipped to make an instant return to the Premier League in the 2005–06 season having retained the majority of their squad.[3] The club failed to mount the expected promotion challenge which led to some supporters calling for Worthington to leave the club.[4] Despite pressure from supporters, Worthington retained his position to remain in charge for the beginning of the 2006–07 season. After a defeat to Plymouth Argyle in September 2006, Norwich's majority shareholders, Delia Smith and Michael Wynn-Jones, released a statement expecting Worthington to improve the team's performance in the following matches.[5] Norwich's following game, a 4–1 defeat to Burnley, was Worthington's final game in charge as he was sacked almost immediately after the result.[6]

Towards the end of the 2006–07 season, Worthington was appointed caretaker manager of relegation threatened Championship side Leicester City.[7] Despite losing his first game to former club Norwich, he was able to steer the Foxes to safety and stated his desire to become Leicester's permanent manager.[8] He lost out on the position to Martin Allen.[9]

Worthington was appointed as manager of Northern Ireland in June 2007, initially on a short term contract until the end of the Euro 2008 qualifying tournament in November.[10] At the time of his appointment, Northern Ireland led their qualification group. Although Northern Ireland eventually finished third in their qualification group, the Irish Football Association were suitably impressed enough to give Worthington a two-year contract until 2010.

Billy_Thompson_(soccer): definition of Billy_Thompson_(soccer) and synonyms of Billy_Thompson_(soccer) (English)

Billy Thompson (soccer) From Wikipedia

Worthington United Soccer Club

Wellington High School

1 Senior club appearances and goals

counted for the domestic league only.

William “Billy” Thompson (born May 5, 1968 in Cupertino, California) is a retired U.S. soccer player who coaches youth soccer. He earned one caps with the U.S. national team and played three seasons in Major League Soccer with the Columbus Crew.

College

Thompson, born in Cupertino, California, attended UCLA where he played as a forward on the men’s soccer team from 1986 to 1990. Thompson earned first team All American honors as a senior. That year he was the captain of the Bruins team which won the NCAA championship. Thompson was also the 1990 ISAA Player of the Year and finished his time at UCLA with 42 goals and 27 assists.

Early career

While playing with UCLA, Thompson spent the 1988 and 1989 collegiate off season with the Los Angeles Heat of the Western Soccer Alliance. [1] In 1988, he was named to the WSA All Star team. [2]

Following his last season at UCLA, Thompson was a member of the U.S. soccer team at the 1991 World University Games. He then moved to France to play for Pau, of the French Second and Third divisions. He was with the team from 1991 to 1994 before returning to the United States for a short spell with professional beach soccer which led him to compete in the Beach Soccer World Championship in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil a year later. In 1995 he spent a single season with the Hawaii Tsunami of the USISL. He was the league’s Offensive MVP. [3] That same year he also guest played with Raj Pracha FC of Thailand.

On February 6-7, 1996, Major League Soccer (MLS) held its first draft. The Columbus Crew selected Thompson in the third round (21st overall) ahead of fellow Bruins Eddie Lewis, Frankie Hejduk, and Ante Razov. At the time he was playing indoor soccer with the Tampa Bay Terror of the National Professional Soccer League. [4] Thompson went on to play four seasons with the Crew. However, at the end of his second season, in which he saw time in only six games (four as a starter), the Crew did not protect Thompson during the expansion draft. The next season, he came back strong, appearing in twenty-nine games. However, he retired at the end of the 1999 season finishing with 4 goals and 18 assists for his MLS career.

After retiring from professional soccer, Thompson remained in Columbus. In 1999 he served as the assistant coach to the Ohio Wesleyan women’s soccer team. The next season he was an assistant to the men’s soccer team. He is also the head coach for the Wellington High School girls' team. In 2000, Thompson joined Worthington United, a local youth soccer club, leading the 1990 boys team to the Ohio State Cup semifinals in 2006 and 2007, and to their first state title in 2008. In 2008 Worthington United merged with the Columbus Crew to become Worthington Crew Juniors, a developmental academy for the Columbus Crew of Major League Soccer. Thompson is currently the Director of Coaching for the Worthington Crew Juniors and Crew Juniors Soccer programs. Background includes former coaching for the Olympic Development Program. Currently, Thompson coaches Worthington Crew Juniors, and is devoted to the Developmental Academy Team. He was awarded Ohio South's coach of the year honors in 2005 and holds a NSCAA national coaching diploma.

National team

Thompson earned one cap with the U.S. national team. [5] His one cap came in a 1-0 victory over Costa Rica on June 14, 1988. [6] While he has only one cap, he played seventeen total games with the national team, but sixteen of those were not full internationals.

References External links Billy Thompson (soccer) From Wikipedia

Worthington United Soccer Club

Wellington High School

1 Senior club appearances and goals

counted for the domestic league only.

William “Billy” Thompson (born May 5, 1968 in Cupertino, California) is a retired U.S. soccer player who coaches youth soccer. He earned one caps with the U.S. national team and played three seasons in Major League Soccer with the Columbus Crew.

College

Thompson, born in Cupertino, California, attended UCLA where he played as a forward on the men’s soccer team from 1986 to 1990. Thompson earned first team All American honors as a senior. That year he was the captain of the Bruins team which won the NCAA championship. Thompson was also the 1990 ISAA Player of the Year and finished his time at UCLA with 42 goals and 27 assists.

Early career

While playing with UCLA, Thompson spent the 1988 and 1989 collegiate off season with the Los Angeles Heat of the Western Soccer Alliance. [1] In 1988, he was named to the WSA All Star team. [2]

Following his last season at UCLA, Thompson was a member of the U.S. soccer team at the 1991 World University Games. He then moved to France to play for Pau, of the French Second and Third divisions. He was with the team from 1991 to 1994 before returning to the United States for a short spell with professional beach soccer which led him to compete in the Beach Soccer World Championship in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil a year later. In 1995 he spent a single season with the Hawaii Tsunami of the USISL. He was the league’s Offensive MVP. [3] That same year he also guest played with Raj Pracha FC of Thailand.

On February 6-7, 1996, Major League Soccer (MLS) held its first draft. The Columbus Crew selected Thompson in the third round (21st overall) ahead of fellow Bruins Eddie Lewis, Frankie Hejduk, and Ante Razov. At the time he was playing indoor soccer with the Tampa Bay Terror of the National Professional Soccer League. [4] Thompson went on to play four seasons with the Crew. However, at the end of his second season, in which he saw time in only six games (four as a starter), the Crew did not protect Thompson during the expansion draft. The next season, he came back strong, appearing in twenty-nine games. However, he retired at the end of the 1999 season finishing with 4 goals and 18 assists for his MLS career.

After retiring from professional soccer, Thompson remained in Columbus. In 1999 he served as the assistant coach to the Ohio Wesleyan women’s soccer team. The next season he was an assistant to the men’s soccer team. He is also the head coach for the Wellington High School girls' team. In 2000, Thompson joined Worthington United, a local youth soccer club, leading the 1990 boys team to the Ohio State Cup semifinals in 2006 and 2007, and to their first state title in 2008. In 2008 Worthington United merged with the Columbus Crew to become Worthington Crew Juniors, a developmental academy for the Columbus Crew of Major League Soccer. Thompson is currently the Director of Coaching for the Worthington Crew Juniors and Crew Juniors Soccer programs. Background includes former coaching for the Olympic Development Program. Currently, Thompson coaches Worthington Crew Juniors, and is devoted to the Developmental Academy Team. He was awarded Ohio South's coach of the year honors in 2005 and holds a NSCAA national coaching diploma.

National team

Thompson earned one cap with the U.S. national team. [5] His one cap came in a 1-0 victory over Costa Rica on June 14, 1988. [6] While he has only one cap, he played seventeen total games with the national team, but sixteen of those were not full internationals.

References External links

All translations of Billy_Thompson_(soccer)

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Coaching Kids Soccer Using Fun Activities

Coaching Kids Soccer

Coaching kids soccer can be difficult, because young athletes seem to always be wandering in a different direction! How can coaches keep their athletes’ attentions and keep control of their practices? By mixing up activities and using as many senses as possible, coaches give athletes an outlet for their energy while still teaching them. By keeping lessons short and focused, they also encourage athletes to pay attention before being let loose.

Coaching kids soccer requires one to be innovative and always engaging. Kids do not stay focused for long, so coaches must constantly invent new mechanisms for keeping athletes excited about participating in soccer and learning. To do this, coaches should rely on their own creativity and try to involve as many senses as possible in their activities.

For example, when teaching a new skill, coaches can explain orally the moves, involving listening and paying attention. Athletes can repeat the soccer coaching tips they've learned; this will ensure they pay close their attention. Then, athletes can touch the soccer ball and work on physically trying the new skill, using movement and the sense of touch. Together, athletes stay engaged in the lesson and the coach maintains control of the practice.

Recommended Resource Discover 28 Fundamental Drills for Developing a Top-Notch Soccer Team!

Engage your players. Improve their skills. Win more soccer games starting today!

Inside the Essential Soccer Skills and Drills eBook, you'll discover 28 simple, fun and EFFECTIVE drills for dribbling, ball control, passing, receiving, defense and shooting.

All explained with simple, step by step instructions and detailed diagrams.

Keep it Short

Coaches do not have much time with athletes before their minds will begin to wander. To stretch out this time and get more undivided attention from young athletes, coaches should work to involve athletes by asking them questions, asking them to repeat things just said, summarizing important lessons, and making the session interactive.

Because of short attention spans, coaches should keep lessons concise and very focused. By encouraging athletes to pay attention to one lesson at a time, broken up by periods of physical activity and reviews of material covered earlier in the practice, coaches lengthen the amount of serious time they have with young athletes.

Increase Interactivity When Coaching Kids Soccer

Youth today are not as able to sit and absorb information as previous generations because of the readily available media streams. They are now able to process multiple inputs at once and often get bored or restless if they are simply listening to someone talk at them. To reach young athletes on their level, consider introducing interactive components to soccer practice.

Coaches can use media in different ways during practice. If there is a facility with a computer and internet access, coaches can show athletes videos of famous soccer players in competitions or demonstrating new skills the coach has just taught. A good resource for this is youtube.com. Coaches should remember that any internet usage by young athletes needs to be heavily monitored by responsible adults to prevent athletes from wandering to inappropriate sites or accessing unapproved material.

Those coaching kids soccer can also provide written material or charts for older athletes who can read and write. Charts could contain a list of what skills have been taught, when they were first introduced, and the coach’s assessment of how well the athletes perform that skill. For written material, coaches can pass out brief instructions about skills or a one-page review of what has been taught to that point in the season.

Pro Tips for Tackling CrossFit’s Toughest Moves, Men - s Fitness

Pro tips for tackling CrossFit’s toughest moves Three top CrossFit coaches share their strategies for mastering CF’s most skill-heavy movements.

No athlete masters double-unders, muscle-ups, and handstand push-ups on day one of CrossFit. Getting these moves down takes practice, patience, and of course a killer training strategy. To give you a leg up, we talked to three CrossFit coaches about the best ways to approach each of these moves.

Double-Unders

Spinning a jump rope under your feet twice per jump—it sounds difficult, but doable. But where do you start? By jumping higher? Bending your knees more? To answer this question, we spoke to Will Lanier, general manager at BRICK Sport Performance Training in New York City, who explained how he coaches his athletes through mastering the double-under. “There are three things that athletes must keep in mind when trying to master this movement—the jump itself, the origin of the motion, and the frequency of practice,” he says.

Next, pay attention to your wrists—that’s where the movement starts. “When learning, many athletes tend to make their arms spin like gigantic windmills. Stop. Just stop,” instructs Lanier. “It's all in the wrist. If you're looking in the mirror and you see your arms moving like a crazy person trying to do the ‘Single Ladies’ dance, you're doing it all wrong.”

Lastly, practice every day. “Throwing in two to three minutes of DU practice before every WOD will have you mastering this movement in no time,” says Lanier.

The holy grail of CrossFit movements, muscle-ups require you to bring your body from a hanging position below a bar or set of rings to above the bar or rings with your arms extended (it looks like this). Nate Forster, CrossFit coach/competitor and owner of Reebok CrossFit 5th Ave and Reebok CrossFit Miami Beach, provided a game plan for how to improve.

Start by taking note of your grip. “I never teach false grip [wrist placed above the bar or ring rather than below it],” says Forster. “Everyone should learn how to do it from a regular grip.”

Before attempting a muscle-up on the high rings, beginners should practice muscle-up progressions on a low set of rings, and do so on a daily basis. When you’re ready to go for the full muscle-up, give your body time to adjust to the technique. “For five weeks, I suggest doing five sets of muscle-up attempts without even trying to go over the rings,” says Forster. “That muscle memory alone will help you take your muscle-ups to the next level.”

“Athletes should also know that there are three key parts to the muscle-up: the kip, high hips, and fast head through the rings, all of which need to be over exaggerated. That’s when you know you’re doing it right,” says Forster. “Visualize this: There is a mirror on the other side of the rings and you have to break that mirror with your head. Swing as fast as you can, think about bringing your belly button up to the rings, keep your elbows tucked in, and just go.”

Handstand Push-Ups

Handstands are tricky enough on their own, but handstand push-ups require you to not only be upside down, but also press your bodyweight while you're inverted. We caught up with Nick Vera, head coach and general manager at Mission CrossFit San Antonio to get his expert tips for athletes looking to improve this movement.

Vera went on to tell us how kipping can help you perfect the handstand push-up. “Those who are proficient in kipping have a huge advantage over those doing strict handstand push-ups," he says. "Because they will not only save their shoulders by kipping, but they can also potentially move faster if they have mastered the skill."

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